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Dear Friends and Colleagues,

In these unprecedented times, due to widespread censorship heretofore seen only in totalitarian countries, but now occurring in our own, one of the biggest challenges we face is our ability to discern the truth.

The consequences of being unable or unwilling to discern have never been more pressing:

‘Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness…’ (Isaiah 5:20)

In general, people can’t be rushed to accept a painful truth unless they’re ready. Regardless of how much credible evidence is presented, if someone is in denial due to psychological or spiritual obstacles, no amount of proof will convince them otherwise, especially if the evidence threatens long-held beliefs that are fundamental to their identity.

Pride and ego may also play a part in denial. If someone considers himself educated, successful and wise, it can be hard to admit he was wrong about something important, or that he was duped by others. He may feel embarrassed and worried that he could be diminished in the eyes of those who respect him, but there’s no shame in having been deceived by charlatans. Those who ought to feel ashamed are the deceivers, although that’s unlikely due to lack of conscience on the part of people who habitually lie.

In fact, it’s a sign of strength when someone is able to admit they were fooled, or is willing to own a big mistake. Employees admire when their boss can take responsibility for an error. Children whose parents are willing to show fallibility are able to model how to be human themselves. Saying, “I was wrong. I’m sorry.” is liberating for both parties and a sign of psychological maturity.

At the end of the day, each of us has a unique path to navigate that can’t be dictated or rushed by another.

My own journey during this surreal period is reflected in various art and writing projects, as well as new professional associations. This updated website includes some of those endeavors.

author
author
artist
artist
psychologist
psychologist